European Microbeam Analysis Society (EMAS) 2013 European Workshop on Modern Developments and Applications in Microbeam Analysis


Dr_Bunker_EMAS_Cerium_PresentationDr. Kristin Bunker, Senior Scientist at RJ Lee Group and President of the Microbeam Analysis Society USA, will deliver a presentation at the European Microbeam Analysis Society (EMAS) 2013 European Workshop on Modern Developments and Applications in Microbeam Analysis at the Centro de Congressos do Alfândega in Porto, Portugal. The conference will take place from May 12 through May 16, 2013. Dr. Bunker’s presentation is entitled, “Physicochemical characterisation of cerium particles generated by combustion of Ce-doped diesel fuel.” Scientists from across the globe will attend the conference, which will focus on assessing the state-of-the-art and reliability of microbeam analysis techniques.

EMAS, founded in 1987, is the European arm of the Microbeam Analysis Society, focusing on methodology for performing microbeam analysis. The organization focuses on three primary purposes – education, communication, and innovation.

Presentations:

Monday, May 13, 2013

11:15 a.m. – Dr. Kristin Bunker, “Physicochemical characterisation of cerium particles generated by combustion of Ce-doped diesel fuel”

Diesel engines emit nitrogen oxides and diesel soot, both of which degrade air quality and harm public health. These concerns have prompted the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to issue tougher regulations on soot emissions. Nanoscale metal-oxide fuel-borne catalysts (FBCs) have been shown to reduce soot emissions and improve fuel efficiency in diesel engines. Three FCBs are commercially available today which employ nano-sized cerium oxide (ceria) particles as the catalyst. The EPA’s Nanomaterial Research Strategy has targeted nano ceria as a nanomaterial of concern due to its potential release to the atmosphere through its use as a fuel additive.

High-resolution electron microscopy coupled with size-resolved particle sampling was employed to characterize cerium-rich particles emitted in diesel exhaust generated by combustion of fuel doped with a ceria-based catalyst. Most of the ceria particles were observed to be either embedded in or attached to larger soot agglomerates, although isolated ceria particles were also identified. Nearly all of the particles were aggregates (~12-300 nm) of primary ceria catalyst particles which had fused or melted together during combustion.

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