Publications

Airborne Asbestos Take-home Exposures During Handling of Chrysotile-contaminated Clothing Following Simulated Full Shift Workplace Exposures

Publication Information:

Sahmel J, Barlow CA, Gaffney S, Avens HJ, Madl AK, Henshaw J, Unice K, Galbraith D, DeRose G, Lee RJ, Van Orden D, Sanchez M, Zock M, and Paustenbach DJ, “Airborne Asbestos Take-home Exposures During Handling of Chrysotile-contaminated Clothing Following Simulated Full Shift Workplace Exposures,” J Expo Sci Environ Epidemiol. Apr 29 2015.

Year: 2015

Topics: EH&S

The potential for para-occupational, domestic, or take-home exposures from asbestos-contaminated work clothing has been acknowledged for decades, but historically has not been quantitatively well characterized. A simulation study was performed to measure airborne chrysotile concentrations associated with laundering of contaminated clothing worn during a full shift work day. Work clothing fitted onto mannequins was exposed for 6.5 h to an airborne concentration of 11.4 f/cc (PCME) of chrysotile asbestos, and was subsequently handled and shaken. Mean 5-min and 15-min concentrations during active clothes handling and shake-out were 3.2 f/cc and 2.9 f/cc, respectively (PCME). Mean airborne PCME concentrations decreased by 55% 15 min after clothes handling ceased, and by 85% after 30 min. PCM concentrations during clothes handling were 11-47% greater than PCME concentrations. Consistent with previously published data, daily mean 8-h TWA airborne concentrations for clothes-handling activity were approximately 1.0% of workplace concentrations. Similarly, weekly 40-h TWAs for clothes handling were approximately 0.20% of workplace concentrations. Estimated take-home cumulative exposure estimates for weekly clothes handling over 25-year working durations were below 1 f/cc-year for handling work clothes contaminated in an occupational environment with full shift airborne chrysotile concentrations of up to 9 f/cc (8-h TWA).

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