Publications

Characterization of Ambient Carbonaceous Particles Using Electron Microscopy Techniques

Publication Information:

Casuccio, G.S., Lersch, T.L., Schlaegle, S.F., Martello, D.V. (2002). “Characterizations of Ambient Carbonaceous Particles Using Electron Microscopy Techniques.” Fuel Chemistry Division Preprints, 47(2), 624, available here.

Year: 2002

Topics:

Introduction The current understanding of the carbonaceous component associated with ambient particulate matter is limited. In most ambient speciation studies, carbon is determined through the thermal/optical evolution analysis of particulate matter collected on quartz fiber filters. Although organic carbon and elemental carbon are determined using the thermal/optical method, there is disagreement as to the accuracy of the results. 1 Furthermore, since organic carbon can originate from both combustion and naturally occurring sources, there is a need to obtain additional resolution on the organic fraction. In an effort to improve the current understanding of the carbonaceous component associated with fine particulate matter, the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is conducting studies that are designed to provide greater resolution on the carbonaceous component. As part of this effort, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), computer controlled scanning electron microscopy (CCSEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques are being employed to provide detailed information on individual carbon particle characteristics. This paper outlines how electron microscopy methods are being used to complement the bulk carbon analysis methods. Information is provided to illustrate how morphology and individual particle chemistry data can be used to help speciate carbonaceous particulate matter.
CHARACTERIZATION OF AMBIENT CARBONACEOUS PARTICLES USING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY TECHNIQUES.