Publications

Modeling Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Saline Aquifers: Significance of Elevated Pressures and Salinities

Publication Information:

Allen, D. E., B.R. Strazisar, Y. Soong et al., “Modeling Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Saline Aquifers: Significance of Elevated Pressures and Salinities,” Fuel Processing Technology 86, (14-15), 1569- 1580, 2005.

Year: 2005

Topics:

The ultimate capacity of saline formations to sequester carbon dioxide by solubility and mineral trapping must be determined by simulating sequestration with geochemical models. These models, however, are only as reliable as the data and reaction scheme on which they are based. Several models have been used to make estimates of carbon dioxide solubility and mineral formation as a function of pressure and fluid composition. Intercomparison of modeling results indicates that failure to adjust all equilibrium constants to account for elevated carbon dioxide pressures results in significant errors in both solubility and mineral formation estimates. Absence of experimental data at high carbon dioxide pressures and high salinities make verification of model results difficult. Results indicate standalone solubility models that do not take mineral reactions into account will underestimate the total capacity of aquifers to sequester carbon dioxide in the long term through enhanced solubility and mineral trapping mechanisms. Overall, it is difficult to confidently predict the ultimate sequestration capacity of deep saline aquifers using geochemical models.

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