Publications

Sources and Composition of PM2.5 at the National Energy Technology Laboratory in Pittsburgh during July and August 2000

Publication Information:

Anderson, R. R., D. V. Martello, P. C. Rohar, B. R. Strazisar, J. P. Tamilia, K. Waldner, C. M. White, W. K. Modey, N. F. Mangelson, D. J. Eatough, “Sources and Composition of PM2.5 at the National Energy Technology Laboratory in Pittsburgh during July and August 2000,” Energy & Fuels 16, 261-269, 2002.

Year: 2002

Topics:

PM2.5 mass was measured daily with three batch samplers, a PM2.5 R&P Partisol-Plus FRM, an Andersen RAAS, and a BYU PC-BOSS, and continuously with a TEOM monitor during July and August 2000. PM2.5 composition was also determined. These data are part of an ongoing PM2.5characterization program centered around a sampling site at the National Energy Technology Laboratory Pittsburgh campus. The composition and concentrations of PM2.5 were both highly variable during this time period. Likely sources of PM2.5 during low concentration periods were transportation, coal-fired boiler, and other emissions generated in the local area. For these periods, the average concentration of PM2.5 was 13 μg/m3 and 70% of the PM2.5 mass was carbonaceous material, including semivolatile organic material that was lost in varying degrees from both the TEOM and FRM samplers. In contrast, much higher concentrations of PM2.5 were associated with transport of pollutants to the site. Analysis of meteorological and back-trajectory data suggests that these pollutants were emitted elsewhere during a period of high atmospheric pressure and were subsequently transported to the site with the passage of a frontal system. When the PM2.5 collected at the site originated from the west or southwest, the concentrations averaged 31 μg/m3 and ammonium sulfate averaged 54% of the PM2.5 mass. Scanning election microscopy and trace element analyses are consistent with the association of high concentration PM2.5 episodes with transport of coke and iron processing, coal-fired boiler, and other emissions from the Ohio River Valley region to the NETL site. Preliminary observations on the use of SEM and PIXE data in source apportionment at the NETL site are given.

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